Making and breaking borders

Thunder has been coming over the house. Last night the lightning was incredible, and half the village had power issues. We didn’t, but the dog was barking to warn us for this dangerous flashes outside. Thanks, but please be quiet now. In my dreams I picture how it will be to live in the wagon, which yet has to be build. I picture how I will survive, which trouble I might get, where I have to think about. I picture me, camping in my parents garden, surrounded by sheep, ducks, horses and dogs. Disconnected from electricity, water and sewerage. Living on the edge.

In the day I find in an occasional search on the internet a Belgian horse which has been used for traveling with a wagon. Even though I’m not searching for a horse yet, since I first want to build the wagon, I can’t stop myself sending a message. It turns out the horse is sold already, but also that they couldn’t go further than the Netherlands since the hills of the south were already too heavy for the horse to pull the wagon up all alone. Okay, two horses. Lines are redrawn.

010The wagon I’ve been looking out for since quite some weeks, I decided to buy it. Got an agreement with the current owner payment-wise, and I bought it last week. The old one has to be sold, but the iron-dealer didn’t turn up. Got to call another one, before the new wagon will arrive. We’re busy planning how to make a coverage on the drive-way under which I can build and which will protect the wagon from rain, that I almost forget to be super happy with this new frame. It’s including breaks, lights, plates, almost rust free (except some little spots which need some fixing)… Of course, little things need always fixing, but this frame represents hope. Yes, it was expensive, more than I was hoping to give for a wagon, since I have got no money. But a good frame is so super important, it’s the basis of all that follows. So I’m willing to spend a little more money, to have a good start. As soon as it arrives I need to restrain myself from wanting to build immediately: first the rusty spots need to be fixed, the breaks need to be checked, the hand-break needs to be moved, the wood needs to be taken off, it needs to be washed and cleaned, maybe painted over. Then I need to measure exactly how big this frame is, and where the four holes are in which I can put base-poles for the frame-work. And when I have that, I need to draw out exactly how everything is going to be build, from finish to start, since I don’t wanna end up halfway realizing I should have……
 
It does mean however, that I can start working soon on this project. I’m happy. I’m realistic too. I’m searching jobs, since it seems my body isn’t suitable for the drug-researches I wanted to do. Got declined twice, so one more try and I’ll stop trying. Probably I’m going to work at the mail, sorting mail before it gets handed over to the delivery-guys. A simple job, but I’ve worked at the mail before and I rather liked it, so let’s do it again. It earns little money, but it’s an income, which is more than none. I can always try to get another small job to fill in the gaps, or maybe this one small job turns out to be enough. Just got my masters-degree and applying for a job as mail-sorter. Talking about breaking borders.
Of course I’m still felting, which is also a job. This Saturday we’ll be at a marked to sell our products, come of you like! It’s in Haren, and its an art-marked. Last year my mom has sold lots of things there, it was the best marked of the whole year, so we’re busy preparing. We have both our own style, my mom dislikes mine, I wouldn’t buy hers, but if we like our own work, it means there will be other people who like our work. And together we can satisfy more customers, with our diverse styles. We’re breaking each others borders, and making our own. 
Come and discover your borders, Saturday the 3th of September in Haren (The Netherlands).
Please follow and like us:
0

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.