Travel plans and tiny houses

Returning topics of discussions are my travel plans and the concept of tiny houses: am I going to build a tiny house? For the second question I have no clear answer, because the answer is both yes and no. The tiny houses idea has become really popular in the past years, and of course, a horse-drawn wagon on wheels where one is living in, does fit in the concept ‘tiny house’. However, my project isn’t at all based onto this movement or the idea of tiny houses, but on the concept of how Roma people, or Dom (see my updated page on the history of the Vardo), used to travel around. The Vardo I am going to build is not going to be a Vardo as used in the past 150 years, more or less, by Roma people, not at all. And also, I am not a Roma, so how can I use this tradition? Well, it’s my inspiration. Its a romanticized idea where I’m inspired by, and I’m well aware of it, since the Roma have not had it easy, basically, ever. But I do want to give credit to those who are my inspiration. So am I building a tiny house and might I get good ideas from this whole movement? Probably. But I am not building the Vardo with the idea of building a tiny house.

The second hot topic are my travel plans: where am I going to go? For how long am I going to travel? Well, to answer all your wishes and hopes: I have no idea, and hopefully for years. At the moment I have my head completely and solely onto the building of the Vardo, and however I might be dreaming of a bright future where I travel around and meet wonderful people along the way in even more beautiful places, I have no plans yet. During the three weeks holiday with my parents I stumbled across a saying by Drottning Kristina which fits so well:
 
Den som går sina egna vägar
behöver ingen karta.
 
Those who travel their own roads

are not in need of a map.


I love this saying and it fits perfectly as answer on my travel plans questions, but also on the whole project of building and planning to go with this Vardo wherever life takes me. There are no plans, I can go anywhere. The only rough plan I have is that when the Vardo is finished, I’ll live in it for a while in one place, and then I’ll go around the Netherlands for small rides. I think it is very important to test the wagon first, before going on a serious travel and finding out it isn’t what I thought it would be.
So, having answered those hot questions, I’ll tell you what I’ve done today: I’ve registered myself at the municipality of my parents, where I’m living right now. Yes, I’ve become a number, and can be traced back to an address again. I had to fill in so many forms, and the person behind the counter never had anybody moving back in from abroad, so it was all quite an excitement. This is also part of the preparation for the wagon: registrations, paperworks, insurances… I still don’t really know how I will have to arrange all of this once really travelling, but hopefully along the way this will become more clear.
And besides that? I haven’t been working on the wagon, since the first thing which is needed is the more expert eyes of a smith, as I said. We got a number from a local young smith who loves this kind of projects, spoken with the mom, but the smith is graduating from school right now so only available somewhere beginning July. We’ll keep in touch! Also people in the village are speaking up to be willing to help, so once I know this wagon is good, or once I have a better frame, I’ll have many hands to help out, which is great! 
So, since it was no working on the wagon, I’ve been picking raspberries in the garden, and felting a Drents Moorlandsheep into a nice fleece. Not with the skin at the bottom, but wool instead, it still looks like as if you got the coat of the sheep just like that on your couch. A bit weird, but luckily no sheep has died for it, so actually, it’s really beautiful. 
Have you got any questions which I should answer? Please do ask them, I’d love to answer, or to discuss some topics. 
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